Friday, August 17, 2007
Good Book Hunting: August 16, 2007
The Jewish Community Center in Creve Couer has been holding its annual book sale all week, and we picked the absolute worst night to go to it. The first night is preview night with a cover charge; Friday, today, is half-price day; Saturday, tomorrow, is bag day, where one can buy a bag and have everything that fits into it for five dollars. Last night, then, was the last day at full price, and hence the most picked over selection possible for the full price. Not that it stopped me from finding far too much:
August 16 Book Fair Results
Click for full size
We have:
  • A number of Perry Mason mysteries, including The Case of the Mischievous Doll, The Case of the Fiery Fingers, and The Case of the Horrified Heirs.

  • Several of the Classics Club books I've taken to collecting. New books include History of Plymouth by William Bradford; Selected Stories by Anton Checkov; The Way of All Flesh by Samuel Butler; and Seven Plays by Henrik Ibsen. I already had Selected Works by Cicero, but it was a different printing. This brings my collection to, what, 29 volumes in this set?

  • The Pathfinder by James Fennimore Cooper; I have most of the Leatherstocking books now. Perhaps I should read them.

  • Hallowe'en Party and The Mousetrap (a play) by Agatha Christie.

  • A collection of poetry by someone I'd never heard of, James Kavanaugh.

  • A "chapbook" by local poet Pam Puleo. I knew Pam when I was doing the open mike circuit about 10 years ago. This "chapbook," which looks more like a school project and includes some loose poems tucked into it, looks like a school project. When I read these to the boy, I might try to imitate Ms. Puleo's voice and delivery.

  • A bunch of Camus, including The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays and Caligula and Other Plays.

  • The Realm of Numbers by Isaac Asimov.

  • Star Trek: The Return because I'm interested to see how Shatner got them to resurrect Kirk.

  • The Lost City of Zork because I'm an old school geek.

  • Some philosophy books, including Basic Ethics, Dilemmas, Bertrand Russell's The Problems of Philosophy, and A Casebook on Existentialism.

  • Open Net, George Plimpton's hockey book.

  • Friday by Robert A. Heinlein.

  • A hardback copy of The Andromeda Strain by Michael Crichton.

  • The Closing of the American Mind by Allan Bloom. I am getting quite a collection from Bloom. Probably because I keep thinking he's the guy who got a hand on Naomi Wolf's thigh.

  • The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran.

  • A Death In China by Carl Hiaassen and some other guy. The Carl Hiaassen is what's important.

  • Night Thoughts of a Classical Physicist, some musings of some science guy.
Brian, you say, that's 30 books, meaning that you've picked up 62 this week. Isn't that more than you read in a year?

Not this year, friends; I am at 72 total books and I'm going all the way! Although I'm not sure where that is, but if I can get there in my comfortable recliner, I am there.

I'm a different sort of old school geek. I passed up a copy of Return to Zork today at a small town Sally store. Price was $.79. If it's still there in two weeks I could grab it for you.

I think I already have it. I also have Zork II and Zork III for the Commodore 64.

Or maybe it's Beyond Zork that I have for the PC.

Thanks for the offer, but I'm good.

You know what I really need? A walk through for Suspended. I never did figure that game out.

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