Thursday, October 19, 2006
 
The Song Sounds Familiar
A former World of Warcrafter laments on how the game ruins lives. He enumerates the fundamental flaws:
    First off, let's go back to the time it takes to accomplish anything in the game. To really be successful, you need to at least invest 12 hours a week, and that is bare minimum. From a leadership perspective, that 12 hours would be laughed at... . The "good guildie" who plays about 10 hours a day and seven days a week.
And:
    The game also provides people with a false sense of security, accomplishment, and purpose. Anyone can be a superhero here if they have the time to put in....

    And people put everything on the line for these accomplishments with which they associate much value. I know of children and spouses being forced to play and grind for their parents, threats of divorce, rampant neglect, failing grades in school, and thousands of dollars spent on "outsourcing" foreign help. For what, you ask? Honor. The desire to be the best for at least one week.... The accomplishment and sacrifice itself are meaningless a few days later. Then it's usually off to the races again.
And:
    Finally, when you're a leader there is a call (or more appropriately a demand) for success. Usually those you represent want to keep progressing. They want to keep improving. They want more access to the best things. It is on you to provide it. In my experience, when you fail to progress fast enough, waves ripple throughout the guild and people become dissatisfied. It's your fault, no matter what.
All in all, it sounds like good training for the business world.


Comments:
And the fundamental "to play or not to play" conundrum, no?

hln
 



Now, if it only took an hour to log on and an hour to log off, it would be very, very similar to real life.
 



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To say Noggle, one first must be able to say the "Nah."